Humanities

Staffing

Leanne Bugler (LBu)

Curriculum Leader

Teacher of Humanities (History and RS)

Steve Jackson (SJa)

Director of Character

Teacher of Humanities (Geography)

Helen Banks (HBn)

Lead Practitioner

Geography Co-ordinator

Teacher of Humanities (Geography)

Alison Armstrong-Lee (AAl)

Teacher of Humanities (Geography)

Rebecca McCallum (RMc)

Outdoor Education Co-ordinator

Teacher of Humanities (History)

Laura Naylor (LNa)

History Co-ordinator

Teacher of Humanities (History)

William Burn (WBn)

Teacher of Humanities (History/Maths)

Phil Wilson (PWi)

Headteacher

Teacher of Humanities (RS)

Isabella Worsley (PWi)

RS Co-ordinator

Head of Oakfield House

Teacher of Humanities (RS)

Curriculum Aims: 

We want our students to:

Gain powerful knowledge as well as subject specific skills to become successful global citizens in a modern, diverse Britain.

Geography curriculum aims

We want our students to:

  1. Be active global citizens, equipped with skills and knowledge to survive in a diverse world
  2. Develop powerful knowledge about the world in which we live: focusing on human and physical processes and how their interaction causes change
  3. Be able to use knowledge, skills and concepts confidently when speaking and writing about Geography

History curriculum aims

We want our students to:

  1. Become critical and independent thinkers that can understand Historical narratives have influenced the society around us
  2. Promote British heritage and values, and understand the role this plays in an ever-diversifying British society
  3. Foster the love of learning and enjoyment of History both inside and outside the classroom

Religious Studies curriculum aims

We want our students to:

  1. Know and understand a range of religious and non-religious worldviews, leading to a sense of awe and wonder. 
  2. Develop a love of learning for respect and tolerance to prepare students for life in modern, diverse Britain. 
  3. Engage students in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address.

Key stage 3: 

Geography

At KS3 students study a range of topics from Human and Physical Geography that is relevant to them and the world around us. Geography is evolving as the world around us changes, being adaptable and responsive in our curriculum is important to us as a result of this to ensure we keep our students informed.

In Year 7 our Geographers study:

Module 1: Thinking like a Geographer (local fieldwork- travel plan)

Module 2: Urban living – Manchester

Module 3: How the weather can impact us. (UK – weather diary)

Module 4: Being a Global Citizen (Sustainability)

In Year 8 our Geographers study:

Module 5: Development and life in an LIC (Kenya)

Module 6: The Hazardous world – Tectonic processes and life in Japan

Module 7: Life in a Cold Biome (Glaciation and Antarctica)

Module 8: Water on the land (UK)

In Year 9 our Geographers study:

Module 9: Russia – Resources, impact and power

Module 10: Global population (issues)

Module 11: A continent of contrasts (Asia)

Module 12: The changing shape of the UK (Coastal issues)

History


At KS3 we predominantly teach through a chronological understanding of events. We believe students need a solid understanding of time periods and how events lead to change and continuity over time. As well as this, we finish each key stage three module with a thematic study on social or political History to further embed of how events and actions have changed over time. This provides extended opportunities for students to link topics together and for them to work on their long-term memory through spaced learning. Students are encouraged to compare different time periods and develop their second-order concepts, as well as improving their extended writing, evaluation and source analysis. We place great emphasis on how the role of British History had an impact on the History of countries around the world.   

In year 7 our Historians study:

Module 1: Pre-1066 Britain

Module 2: Medieval Realms: The Norman Conquest

Module 3: Medieval Realms: Life in Medieval Britain

Module 4: Tudors: Establishing control

Module 5: Tudors: Life in Tudor England

Module 6: Thematic Social study: Women

In year 8 our Historians study:

Module 1: Stuarts: Life in Stuart England

Module 2: Britain as the first industrial nation – Case Study: Manchester

Module 3: British Empire: Life in the Americas, Australia and India

Module 4: The fight for civil rights: The journey from Africa to America

Module 5: The fight for civil rights: Improving lives for African Americas

Module 6: Thematic Social study: Black History

In year 9 our Historians study:

Module 1: Causes of World War 1 and Peace Settlements

Module 2: Rise of Adolf Hitler

Module 3: Role of Britain in World War 2

Module 4: Life in Nazi Germany – Case Study: Holocaust

Module 5: Life in Nazi Germany – Case Study: Holocaust

Module 6: Post war British Society

Religious Studies
At KS3 students learn from and about religion through a series of thematic studies. They students study a range of modules on different philosophical, ethical and religious concepts which are adapted from the Tameside Locally Agreed Syllabus. For homework we complete a range of topics from Religious Studies and Life Skills for students to expand on their knowledge and incorporate it into the world around them. For example, students will have opportunity to explore issues of discrimination, bullying, British Values and so much more.

In year 7 our Philosophers study:

Module 1: What difference does it make to believe in…? Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism 

Module 2: What difference does it make to believe in…? Islam, Sikhism

Module 3: What is so radical about Jesus?

Module 4: What is good and what is challenging about being a teenage Muslim or Christian?

Module 5: Should religious buildings be sold to feed the starving? Christian and Muslims 

Module 6: Should religious buildings be sold to feed the starving? Sikhs 

In year 8 our Philosophers study:

Module 1: Does living Biblically mean obeying in the whole Bible? 

Module 2: How can people express the spiritual through the arts? Buddhist, Christian, Jewish

Module 3: How can people express the spiritual through the arts? Muslim, Sikh

Module 4: Is death the end? Does it matter? Christian, Buddhist

Module 5: Is death the end? Does it matter? Non-religious worldviews

Module 6: Does religion help people to be good? Buddhist, Christian, Muslim, Sikh and non-religious worldviews

In year 9 our Philosophers study:

Module 1: Do we need to prove God’s existence?  

Module 2: Do we need to prove God’s existence?  

Module 3: Why is there suffering? Are there any good solutions?

Module 4: Should happiness be the purpose of life?

Module 5: Is religion a power for peace or a cause of conflict in the world today?

Module 6: Is religion a power for peace or a cause of conflict in the world today?

GCSE Geography

Students follow AQA A Geography course. the course is taught across year 10 and 11,  The taught units are:Year 10 – The Living World, Urban Issues and Challenges, The Challenges of Natural Hazards, The Changing Economic WorldYear 11 – Physical landscapes of the UK (Rivers and Coasts), The Challenge of Resource Management. 

There is a focus on fieldwork, enrichment and extension. Included within the course are two fieldwork opportunities: a visit to Manchester’s central business district and a local river study, as well as a residential to east Yorkshire in Term 5.

GCSE History

At GCSE, our students follow the History AQA specification (8145). Students sit two papers, both of which are 2 hours each at the end of year 11. The units we cover across paper 1 and paper 2 are as follows:

Paper 1: Modern World depth studies 

•    Section A: Germany 1890-1945
•    Section B: Peace and conflict: East Vs West, 1945-1972

Paper 2: British History breadth studies

•    Section A: British health and the people, c1000
•    Section B: Norman England, c1066-c1100

A guide of what we teach in Year 10 and Year 11 is as follows:

Year 10: 

Term 1: Germany 1890-1945
Term 2: Peace and Conflict: East Vs West, 1945-1972
Term 3: British health and the people

Year 11:

Term 4: Complete our study of British health and the people
Term 5: Norman England, c1066-c1100
Term 6: Revision

There will be an opportunity for students to complete an investigation of a particular historical site for the Norman England unit, the historical site study will change annually. Examples of sites we have studied so far are Durham Cathedral, Pevensey Castle and the Battle of Hastings.

GCSE Religious Studies

Religious Studies is offered as an option subject to Year 9 students who will sit their exam as an early entry at the end of Year 10. There is also an opportunity to choose Religious Studies in Year 10 when students make their final option choices to complete their exam at the end of Year 11. At GCSE students follow the Religious Studies AQA specification A. Students sit two papers, both of which are 2 hours each. The units we cover across paper 1 and paper 2 are as follows:

Paper 1: Religions

•    Section A: Christian beliefs, teachings and practices
•    Section B: Islam beliefs, teachings and practices

Paper 2: Religion, Philosophy and Ethics

•    Theme A: Relationship and Families
•    Theme B: Religion and Life
•    Theme D: Peace and war
•    Theme E: Crime and Punishment

We interleave paper 1 and paper 2 across two years in order to help support the application of the theory of religions to 21st century issues. A guide on how we structure our teaching of RS is as follows:

Year 10:

Term 1-3 Students study Christian beliefs, teachings and practices as well as Theme A: Relationship and families and Theme B: Religion and life

Year 11:

Term 4-6 Students study Islam beliefs, teachings and practices as well as Theme D: Peace and war and Theme E: Crime and punishment